Sunshine Island

31 10 2012

The trip, Part I – The Customs

Autumn. ‘All the leaves are brown …’ the song goes, and they are, here in Denmark.

Last week it was schools holiday here, and my husband and I also took some days off. To go to the island Bornholm – also called the sunshine island – together with Auntie B.
Denmark is small, but to go to Bornholm, you’ll have to sail. (Hence the island-thing.) 🙂

Czechoslovakian wolfdog

Pandora looking good

Our main focus  was to sail for as short a time as possible, ‘cos we did not know how Pandora would react to the ferry trip. This meant we had to go through Sweden, driving to the Swedish town Ystad and sail to Bornholm.
This is two hours by car and almost two hours by the ferry. And to cross the Swedish border, all Pandora vaccinations had to be in order or else we would be send back with a fine for illegal transportation of animals. So, Pandora is always vaccinated against any relevant illness inclusive Rabies which is the most important when going to Sweden.

Leaving home early Wednesday morning, we crossed the border around 11 o’clock, passing the Oeresunds Bridge into Sweden (This bridge is the actual Bridge from the tv series The Bridge, if anyone’s interested).
In the customs in Sweden, we were stopped!
The custom officer looked at Pandora and said:
–    You have to go to the people over there.
We drove the car to the ‘people over there’, which was three customs officers, four men with photo cameras, one with a movie camera and for me it felt like there was a bunch of other people running around.
A very kind guy explained that they had a campaign in Sweden regarding transportation of animals, including dogs and smaller pets. They asked to see Pandora’s passport and she was requested out of the car so they could scan her chip (placed in the neck right under the skin).
I was a little nervous. We just had a new passport made for her, as the old one has vanished into god-knows-where, and the new one therefor only have the rabies vaccination listed and the vet even made a correction at the first page with correction tape, which I hoped the Swedish customs officer wouldn’t see as an attempt of forgery.
Bringing Pandora out of the car was also kind of exciting. She hated the cameras (movie star or not) and she was very confused of all the people around her.
Luckily the Swedish customs officers were kind and helpful.
We walk away from the crowd and the guy with the chip scanner was gentle and non-threatening as he scanned Pandora.
I crossed my fingers and hoped the number on his screen was the same as the one in the passport, as we had never had it checked.
It was. Actually everything was so much in order that we were praised for the good work and was told that Pandora’s papers were better than ok.
We were ‘set free’ and could continue our trip across Sweden.

The Trip, part II – Sailing

Entering the ferry was no problem to Pandora. She showed no fear of the noise on the car deck and when we left the car to go into the ferry cantina, she was fearless. Indoor though, she stressed and gasp for breath.
The problem was to get space in the cafeteria. There was an area for people with dogs, but it was occupied by people with children. And did they make room for us when we came? NO!
Did they give us the possibility to eat our dinner at the dog-owners-table? No!
So we had to bunch together to eat and to nurse Pandora. She was a little stressed, but she took it very fine.
There were several dogs on the ferry, but Pandora just watched them, didn’t react to them, but somehow it made her more comfortable. If the other dogs didn’t die, she might not either.

Holiday, hotel and hot sun

Well arrived to our hotel, Strandhotellet, we had a small room, but it was okay. I asked if Pandora could go with us to the restaurant, and they said she could.
Great. Now we knew that if it was impossible to find other places to eat on the island we could bring Pandora with us to the restaurant of the hotel.
You see, in the summer time, it’s no problem. We can always eat outside, but in the autumn, it’s a lot colder and eating outdoor is not just a very cold experience, it might also be impossible if the restaurant won’t serve outside.
But let me say: Our four days at Bornholm turned out to be the best and most sunny days since July.
Every day except Sunday, we were able to eat outside.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog kissing human

Pandora kissing Auntie B.

Bornholm is very different from the rest of Denmark. Denmark is known to be quite flat. No hills, no mountains, no rocks. Except for Bornholm, which is solid rock all the way around.
This also makes trekking a lot harder and walking with a dog a lot more dangerous. Therefor I had brought Pandora’s harness. If she fell from a rock, I wouldn’t strangle her, but be able to lift her back to me.
But Pandora hates her harness. HATES!
Actually she gets mentally castrated by it. Seriously. The second she had it on, she went completely depressive, unhappy and definitely not in any danger – we thought.
But visiting an old ruin, a medieval fortress Hammershus, the silly dog jump up on a low wall. On the other side of the wall there was more than 10 meters drop into nothing. I tugged Pandora down quickly, and while we all got our nerves together she had an even shorter leash.
After that, the harness had to stay on her most of the time, but oh dear, did she hate it.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog at Hammershus

Pandora at Hammershus, frustrated by the harness.

We had many nice walks during the days. The weather was fantastic and both at middays and in the evening we were able to go to restaurants and eat outside. Pandora behaved like an angel.
Every day we bought raw biodynamic beef for her in the supermarket so she was quite spoiled.

The Opal lake

One day we took a walk around an artificial lake called the Opal Lake.

The Opal lake and czechoslovakian wolfdog

The Opal lake seen from above

It’s very beautiful and the colour of the wather is opal blue. I guess perhaps there is 2-3 kilometres all the way around and again, Pardora was in the harness as the edge was a steep fall at more than 20 meters.
As we got all the way around, there was a path where we could go to the lakeshore and let Pandora free.
She went completely crazy-happy. Running around and jumping into the lake swimming. Those of you who follow this blog, might know that Pandora swims, but not much.
She did that day. Obviously she needed to cool down. And after her swim, she found a spot in the lake and there she stood relaxing. Observing her surroundings, not moving at all. She might have needed to cool down. She was sooo sweet, just sitting there.
After that, she seemed refreshed and we found another sport where she could let out some steam before we had to go back to the hotel.

Czechoslobvakian wolfdog bathing in the Opal Lake

Pandora relaxing in the Opal Lake

Dueodde

The next day we went to Dueodde.
This is a very different landscape than the rest of the island. This is a beach with white sand as far as the eye can see. Here we had yet another chance to let Pandora be free and we took a lot of photos there, as the colours were so beautiful.
It was a great day.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog at Dueodde

Pandora at Dueodde

Czechoslovakian wolfdog at Dueodde II

Pandora at Dueodde, II

The last day we were at the island, we took a long walk into the rocky landscape. The rocks were ascending and the higher we went, the more careful we had to be with Pandora. As we went back down, we found a sort of natural bay, where Pandora could run free. She was so funny, blowing out steam again, jumping around from rock to rock, bathing and playing.
It was obvious that she missed her time off the leash.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog blowing out steam

Pandora blowing out steam

Dining

We eat several different places during the holidays, but I’ll recommend these:
At the Strand Hotel (Strandhotellet) in Sandvig we could bring the dog to the restaurant. Pandora was even offered water to drink.
At the cafe ‘Margeritten’ in Allinge, we ate outside, but we were treated very kind and Pandora was offered water
At the cafe ‘Det Gamle Posthuset’ also in Allinge, we went for lunch and Pandora was invited in. Great!

The trip, part III – Going home

The trip home was actually the hardest.
I’m not sure why, but Pandora was so stressed on the ferry this time. It took at least half an hour before she could relax, but finally she did. I think she might have been tired, as she didn’t want strange people to touch or caress her, just the three of us in her pack.

We came home Sunday night. Monday Pandora slept like a baby, eyes hard shut and dreaming.
I guess the trip had made an impact on her after all, or perhaps she was just having nightmares because of the harness.

PS. Looking at all the holiday photos when we came home, it appears that in 90 out of 100, a wolfdog is showing. How can that be?





… and then she saw the light!

12 07 2010

‘Facts about the wolfdog’ has been updated with a lot of information.


Finally last Saturday morning she saw the light of the God of Swimming. And she was swimming like she’d never done anything else.
So now we can go to the lake and swim all three of us whenever we want, and so we do.

After playing with her mates  Arthur , Thor and Cirkeline – who luuuves water, she didn’t recognise how deep in the water she was, so next day as we went to the lake, she just started to swim.
And Sunday she took her first jump from the wooden pier by her own free will.
It’s so great and I am so proud of her.
She is a fantastic swimmer, thanks to all the swimming lessons last winter, I suppose.
Now we have been swimming 5-8 times since and now she starts to whimper when we arrive to the lake.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog swimming

Pandora swimming

Holiday
Soon our vacations starts and we will go to Holland and visit the Kennel van Goverwelle.
We talked a lot about going to Italy and visit Venice, Florence and Pisa, but ended up with Holland. I hope we’ll go to Italy next year and it’s good to wait until Pandora has matured a little more. But vacation without Pandora is not an issue.
I would probably never do that. What kind of holiday would it be if I missed her every day, which I do even if I’m without for a day?
No, no, future holidays will be with the girl.

Today we will go to the vet and get her 1-year vaccination and she’ll have a health check.
I’m also excited to see how much she weighs as she has now been reduced in her daily food. It has not been a problem as she doesn’t eat much in this heat.
We cut her down to 500 grams, but these last days she haven’t been eating more than 250 grams, and she eats it late in the evening when it’s no longer so warm outside.
We also recently changed the habit of feeding her twice a day to only feeding her in the evening.
Now we have to convince ourselves that she should also have 1 fasting day a week.

Fur and summer heat
Pandora’s winter fur is gone but she is still shedding. It’s like these very hot days (30 °C/86 °F) makes her loose even more fur. Her total coat is still very thick and the hair strands are long (7-8 cm on the back). She really is suffering in the heat and always finds a place in the shadows. Unlike many other dogs I have had, she knows to look for the shadow or a cold floor.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog a rose among roses

A rose among roses

The tale
I have a little completely unimportant observation here.
When ever I brush Pandora’s tale or just touch it, she is never reacting weirdly. I can touch her tale, brush it and play with it, she doesn’t care.
All other dogs I have had, had a weird relationship to their tales. Like their tales wasn’t part of them. If I brushed them a little hard, the dog would turn its face to my hand to watch what I was doing or even look like if I was rougher they would bite (None of them ever did though). It’s difficult to explain the awkwardness the other dogs showed to their tale, but to Pandora her tale is just as much a part of her as her legs or ears. She seems to be aware of her tale and she is of course very dependent on it for her super balancing acts.

Digger dog
Our entire garden is filled with little holes that Pandora has made over the time. But they are small, like half a football or something.
Lately, as we have gone to the beach and to our favourite lake, she has been digging holes in a different scale.
One of the wolfdogs trademarks are exactly that. Digging.
There are at least two reasons for the wolf to dig.
The female digs dens to have a place to hide  when the she’s in labour. The den will hide and protect the puppies until they are old enough to see daylight the first time. The other reason to dig dens is to create a hiding place in the shadow. The depth of the den in the ground offers coolness on hot days.
I wonder if Pandora’s urge to dig has increased because of the heat.
Nevertheless she has been digging like a maniac the last few times we have gone to the sea or the lake. The soil here is gravel and grit.
And she digs extremely fast.
It’s fascinating to watch.
She digs with a lot of energy. Stop, takes 2-3 steps backward, move the dirt she has just loosened another two metres away.
Back to the hole, digs, stop for 10-20 seconds to catch her breath, digs, 2-3 steps backward to move the loosened dirt.
This is really fascinating. She continues with this for 20-30 minutes. Along the way she also extends the den sideways and one day she managed to dig horizontally so she kind of made a roof on the den.
She never finishes it, though. I hope one day she’ll finish one of her dens. The last two she made was almost big enough to fit her own body.
I have tried to film it and will put it on YouTube soon.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog digging

diggin' diggin' diggin' done





In wolfs land

26 05 2010

Cember
Coincidently our trainer from the Boxer club called a guy to buy a cage from him.
He lived in one of the coast cities at Fyn where we live.
He told our trainer that he had used the cage to his Czechoslovakian Wolfdog.
My trainer told him that ‘in her club she also had a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog.’
I guess the guy was pretty doubtful, but to make a long story short, we got his phone number and contacted him Thursday, Friday we met.

Czechoslovakian wolfdogs

Pandora and Cember

Mac, as Cember’s father is called, was very pleased to meet Pandora, and we were very happy to meet Cember.
Finally a Wolfdog, not too far away from us.
The two dogs made friendship immediately, played and went along very well.
Cember is a big and beautiful guy. A good 75 cm tall which is a great deal bigger that Pandora, but he treated her so nice.
The two dogs met in the dog forests. A smaller one than the one we usually go to, so we made a new appointment with Mac and Cember, and met them again Sunday in our big dog forest.
Here we also met the Jack Russels, the white Swizz Cirkeline and some new friends.
But Cember is a great supplement to the circle of friends. I hope we see him soon again.

Czechoslovakian wolfdogs

Pandora and Cember

In wolfs land
Last Thursday we went to Sweden.
A long car ride of nearly 400 km. It’s not that long to us, the humans, but to Pandora it is a long trip.
To bring a dog from Denmark into Sweden, the dog must be vaccinated against Rabies and within the last 10 days before crossing the border, the dog must be treated for intestinal worms.
All that was of course in order.

It was one tired Wolfdog that we brought to the summer house in the late afternoon.
Although she’d been sleeping all the way (with only two stops to stretch legs and get something to eat) she was tired and had these cute looking sleepy eyes the rest of the day.
She played around a little, but slept like a baby all night. Actually our bedroom was very cold the first night, so Pandora slept in the foot end of my bed with a cover.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog in sweden

Pandora in sweden

Call of the wild
Next morning we went for a long trip in the Swedish forests. It was so quite and beautiful there and the only sounds were the birds chirping.
By chance we let Pandora off her leach. She was wearing a luminous waist coat in case hunters should think that she was a real wolf. But we never saw anyone.
Pandora never ran very far away. It was like she was a little insecure of her surroundings.
Before noon we went shopping and all the sleep Pandora got was ten minutes twice in the car.
Home again she was let loose in the garden around the house. And she stayed.
She found small pieces of wood or went digging and sniffing in the nearby forest or in the heather. Thousands of new smells was surrounding her and she just walk around and tried to figure out where they all belonged.
It could have been from wild pigs, squirrels, other dogs, foxes, and with a little luck: moose’s.

After dinner in the evening, she was too tired to go out.
She looked at me with annoyance as I brought her out to do her stuff just before we went to bed.
And then it hit me: she had not been sleeping at all that day. Only 20 minutes on the trips forth and back from the stores.
Even as we shopped, Morten and I went in to the stores on turns. If I went in, Morten walked the dog, and then we changed.
So no sleep for the Wolfdog had made it tired!

Discovering the fear
Next day, we went for 5-6 km walk, but this time Pandora was in her leach. This meant it was a ‘sniffing’ trip, not an exercising trip.
We saw water falls and Pandora climbed the stones near the edge of the cliff.
We also crossed the huge stream on a locker. It was build with an open grate that you could see straight through, and it took Pandora all her courage to follow me across the wild river. But she did it!
As we returned, Pandora was let loose in the garden. She spent half an hour to run around in insanely high speed to burn off the rest of her energy.
After that, she could relax.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog afraid

Pandora discovering fear

Again the evening was quiet. Pandora amused herself by taking wood pieces from the woodpile in the living room and chews it to pieces.
The last day, Sunday, I took a long walk with the girl before we hit the road to return home.

Did she have energy when we came back to our home Sunday afternoon?
Oh yeah.
She managed to take a hike and follow another dog that was out for a walk.

All in all we had a fantastic trip and Pandora was so sweet all the time.
She really enjoyed climbing the cliffs, drinking from the stream and sniffing around to all the new smells in the foreign country.
As usual when she is in the nature, she is so well camouflaged it is obvious that this is her right element.
I sincerely hope we’ll go again soon.

Czechoslovakian wolfdog in Sweden

Pandora in Sweden





Pretty in pink

19 01 2010

Facts: 29 kg. 63 cm, 8 months old.

News: Pandora has got her own YouTube site called:

http://www.youtube.com/Pandorawolfdog

Few movies, but will grow.

Falling down the stairs
The week before last week, Thursday, Pandora fell down the stairs. I was sitting on our loft which has an open side to the staircase. Pandora was sleeping by my side. She was tired after swimming. As she woke up, she wanted to go downstairs, but somehow her hind leg slipped and all I saw was the girl falling over the edge, desperately trying to hang on to the rim with her front paws – and the she fell. On her back on the stairs and bumping down all the way to the floor.

I can’t describe my fear as I ran down the stairs to see what had happened to her.

She was laying all curled up on the floor, her tale between the legs. Paws lifted as in pain.
And not a sound came from her.

Both my husband and I ran to her to see if she was okay. She was cuddled and caressed for a few minutes, and then we got her standing up.
Nothing broken, no limping or anything. She showed no pain or problems with anything but I guess under the fur she might have had some black bruises.

The next day we went to the vet just to get her checked out, and the vet didn’t find anything to be concerned about either.
Thank who ever held a hand or paw over my girl.

Pretty in pink
After the Christmas holidays, going back to work was hard, especially for Pandora who had not been left alone very much during the holidays.
Day one she found a red ball pen to play with as she was alone. The result was fabulous.
Pink front legs – all the way to the knee. With an exhibition coming up it wasn’t the smartest time, but we had a great laugh.

Pink legs

Pink legs

Meeting the fellows – again
Exhibition in Stestrup last Saturday. Stestrup is in the middle of nowhere on Sjælland (Sealand) DK.

It took 1 hour by train to Roskilde. Then a change to another train from Roskilde to Hvalsø. In that train we met up with Rolf and his two darling dogs Xtreme and Uno.

Train ride to Hvalsø, then Taxi from Hvalsø to Stestrup. Luckily Rolf had forum a Taxi driver in Stestrup ahead of the trip.
It was a nice exhibition. Small and unpretentious.
And it was so nice to spend a whole day with the dogs and Rolf. Lots of geeky talk about our fur kids, and the dogs playing the entire day.

Watching Pandora playing with the big guys was great. Her godlike admiration of Uno last time in the beginning of October had changed into healthy curiosity so she actually dared to challenge him to play. She had a lot more guts than she had last time.
(Movie will be on YouTube soon).

The exhibition itself went well again. But as Pandora should show her teeth to the judge, she started to growl. He was a very tall man, dressed in dark clothes and he stepped sideways over to Pandora. I could feel her confusion all the way through the leach. A little growling and the judge commented it of course, saying that she should not be like that as she was a big dog that could do a lot of harm with her canine teeth.

I know. So now we must be training ‘showing teeth’ and letting big men pet her.

Pandora received Særdeles Lovende (Excellent) as a puppy and got a 3. place out of 6 puppies. One of the prices was 2.5 kg of dog food that we had to bring home by the train. And Pandora eats raw meat. Sigh!

Thanx to the boys 4 a wonderful day! Hope we’ll meet again before WDS.

Xtreme, Uno and Pandora sleeping

Xtreme, Uno and Pandora sleeping in the train on the way home.

Afraid of everything
She is changing these days.
As at the exhibition she showed fear for the judge, she now also shows fear of a lot of other people and especially children. It is such a radical change within a month that we have decided that we will go and socialize her on people again instead of dogs. Almost everybody we see these days are people with dogs, which makes her ignore the humans as soon as there are dogs.
Her ability to be with other dogs, puppies, small dogs, big dogs is so good now. Now we need people, children and big, tall men.

Heat
I am pretty sure that her changes are course by the fact that she is maturing. She is almost 9 month old. In a month or so, she should be in her first heat.
It seems like certain male dogs already find her interesting, so it may be close to happening. And how great is that as we have 2 more exhibitions this month!
(These two exhibitions will be her last attending as a Puppy, then she’ll move to Junior class)

Xtreme showed some interest in her at this exhibition but I hope we can get through the next exhibitions without all the male dogs freaking out.
I’ll try to give her Chlorophyll (Called Klarfyl) in the hope that it might remove the smell of ‘sexy girl’.

Next exhibition is Saturday 24. January in our own city, Årslev.





Happy New Year

4 01 2010

Facts: 29 kg. 63 cm, 8 months old.

The first snow
December then 15. we went to a concert in Copenhagen and Pandora was for the first time, left in a kennel for the night.
We had our concerns but if she could be there over night we would have this option in the future. Not a solution we would use very often though.
Next morning at 8.30 I parked the car at the kennel. Longing to see Pandora. A whole night without her? Terrible.
A little snow was falling and I was thrilled that I had taken the day off to be with Pandora.
Pandora wasn’t particularly excited to see me; she was desperate to get OUT! Being in a cage for so long? Not nice for a wolfdog.
The caretaker said that she had seemed unsatisfied with being trapped. I was just glad she didn’t whine or cry when she saw me. Her need of freedom was so much more important to her.
As we drove home (only 3 km away) the snow started to fall, thick and beautiful.
It was so funny to see Pandora observe it for the first time. First she tried to catch the snowflakes, then she shook her head as snowflakes hit her ears, and then she didn’t understand the concept that if she used her paws to catch them on the ground, the flakes would melt.

Pandora in her very first snow

Pandora in her very first snow

Two ours later the snow was laying thick all over. A beautiful landscape, and Pandora started to figure out what it was all about.

Pandora two in snow hours later

Pandora two in snow hours later

Later that day her best friend Bandit came and played with her in the snow. He stayed until next day and it was one tired wolfdog we had the following evening.

Pandora and Bandit playing in the snow

Pandora and Bandit playing in the snow

Xmas and new year – the fearless wolf
We had a quiet Christmas evening with just our parents. Pandora was surely wondering why a tree had to be in the living room. Great though, that her people had left nice, shining glass balls all over the tree to play with.
They were soon moved away.

Holidays were used on the fur-kid, talking long walks, playing in the snow and sleeping on the sofa.
The day before New Years Night, we were invited to dinner at some friends. Pandora was also invited and her best friend would be there, but also a dachshund. (Wiener dog).

She respected the little furry one. Her observation was probably that the dog was small and therefore should not be bullied. She actually showed signs of maturity.
We went by train to and from there. She coped with the one hour long train ride very well. On the way home she was so tired that she fell asleep on the seats.

Pandora sleeping in the train

Pandora sleeping in the train

New Years Night she managed to steal a big lump of our dinner, delicious beef tenderloin. Luckily we had enough beef so we could just laugh about it.
At 12 o’clock we went out to see the fireworks. Pandora came along by her own free will. She felt absolutely NO fear. She looked up, saw the crackling, colourful fire, and if she could have shrugged her shoulders, she would have. She didn’t care at all.
Clever, cool girl.

Exhibitions coming up
In January we will attend 3 exhibitions. She still goes as a puppy this month. After that, she’ll go as Junior and get new competitors.

Growing up
Suddenly one day I thought: It’s a long time ago since she tried to bite my hands or feet. She doesn’t do that so often anymore. And now it’s only when we play.

She also does not have ‘accidents’ indoor any more. If she has to go out she starts to breathe heavily and whimpers a little.

She met a little Irish wolfhound puppy before Christmas. She treated it so gentle and nice. Now she understands that she is bigger and older and must be careful.

Wolfish
We talk wolfish now. The more I know about the language between wolfs, the easier it is to communicate with Pandora.
Of course we shout: NO or DOWN when she jumps to the kitchen table, but if I’m really mad at her (if she runs to the street or eats another pair of shoes) all I need to do is to look her in the eyes. Staring. After a few seconds she’ll run off, with her tail between her legs..
I show my ‘forgiveness’ by smacking my lips and looking away. Immediately she’ll come back to me to check if she is let back in to the pack.
This is very effective, but I try not to use it too much. We are still a team and corporation is to prefer.

Speaking of this, I must recommend Shaun Ellis from England and his fascinating studies in wolfs.

http://www.wolfpack-management.com/

Wolf-do’s
And the fur girl also does more and more wolfish things.
She always buries bones or other big lumps of food that she cannot eat. If she can’t go to the garden, she buries it in the sofa.

Holes are important. EVERY hole we see as we take our walks is examined. If it is small, she’ll make it bigger. Last week she almost caught a mouse in its hole. Funny to watch.

She opens doors. Now we have to lock the doors. She has no problem by opening it inwards either. If she wants to go out, she’ll go out.

Next
She must learn to be with minor children. She is afraid of children below 12 years or so. It could be that they look her in the eyes or it could be that she has hardly been with any before now.
Ring training continues. We still have a lot to learn.

Swimming continues. Mostly for the fun of it.
Soon we’ll be able to attend Agility or other kind of training. That’ll be good.

So far, we just have to get through the winter without being too bored.





Use your doggy language

17 08 2009

Second week with Pandora alone at home wasn’t too successful either, but also not worse. She still hates it, but as she is picked up after two hours alone by my parents she isn’t alone for very long.
I’ll give it two months to normalize and there are indications that it is possible.

First: Now she can relax in the car as we go shopping and leave her for half an hour or even an hour. When we return, she’s laying on the back seat resting. That’s a good sign. It means that she is ok with being alone in the car even though (or because of?) people are passing by all the time.
Two: Her stomach seems to have become a lot better this last week, my parents noticed. Could indicate that her stress level is falling.
Three: She finds it easier and easier to be alone in another room than us. Or laying in the garden while we are indoor or vise versa.
We haven’t given up yet.

Tooth broke
Pandora had an accident the other day. As she was jumping out of the car, my parents dog tumbled over her by accident and Pandoras snout hit the door frame and one of her baby canine teeth broke. She hardly made a sound. Only the tinniest ‘eerv’ left her mouth. I’m so happy it was a milk tooth that broke. She has no problem chewing anything after this. But Wednesday we are going to the vet to get a rabies vaccination and the vet can look at the tooth then.

Barking
Pandora has begun to bark a lot. It’s not completely at dog bark, but she makes us smile because her bark is very deep for such a small dog.
She is always barking in protest.
If I tell her NO to something that she really wants, she barks in frustration. Like I am very unfair. It’s very funny but we also try to teach not to bark at us as she may look or sound frightening as she gets older.
This is also a quite funny situation as I have started to bark back, growl and show my teeth. And she respects that!
She actually got terrified the first time.
Doggy language is a good language to know.

Bathing
Yesterday she went into some really nasty stinking water at the lake. At home she had to have her feet washed. This doesn’t any longer cause a lot of sounds, only an urge to escape.

The girl is growing
Now 11 kg and 43 cm.
She is charming everybody. Even my mother in law.
“I just love that dog” one of my friends said the other day. And our neighbour likes her and always greet her with hugs and smiles and she likes him and greets him with smiles. She smiles with her ears (laying them flat down) and her black lipped mouth always looks like smiling. He seams to be a ‘real’ friend to her.

Learning
This week I’ll spend a lot of quality time with her. As she grows she needs to learn more stuff and I need to be more strict.
Barking on command is about to become possible. (But not needed – just for fun).
She needs to learn “lay”, “get down” and “here”. Especially coming by command is extremely hard as she is sniffing to everything on her way. I don’t know if she hears my but she sometimes look like I am the least interesting thing on her way.
Staying at our ground is also essential and will not be a problem to learn as long as no other dogs passes by.

Wednesday it’s rabies vaccination day, and that’s only to make it possible to travel to Sweden.
More about that next time.

Enjoying the sun in grandma's chair

Enjoying the sun in grandma's chair





Home alone feat. Pandora

10 08 2009

First week with the doggywolf in the house – alone!

First day:
I had a call at my job from a neighbour I’ve never talk to. She told me that she had a puppy locked in her garage and she thought it might be mine.
Hurry home from work, having all sorts of wild unpleasant fantasies about broken glass, cut up dog, blood all over and so on.
But no.

The dog simply taught herself to open the kitchen door inwards and go through the outer cat flap again.

Buying hooks for all the doors and fix it in the evening before next day.

Day two:
Pandora stayed  at home as long as she should. 1 curtain was ripped apart in desperation to get out, no inventory was touched.

Day 3, 4 and 5, one curtain ripped a day, no inventory ripped. This shows her eager to get out, which makes my heart cry.

Because of her unwillingness to be alone I’ve made the arrangement with my parents that they look after her from before dinner, and till we arrive from work in the afternoon.

They have a very sweet Labrador boy at 4 years and the two dogs play with much joy and amusement.

So until now, it has not been a success to let Pandora be alone, but not a completely disaster either.

This weekend we went to Aabenraa  in south Denmark.

To our big surprise we met another Czechoslovakian wolfdog at a medieval market. A 11 month old female. She was very beautiful.

Unfortunately did I not get neither picture, nor address from the owners which annoys me now.

To my big surprise we also met 3-4 people who actually knew what kind of dog Pandora is. Somehow people close to Germany know this dog better than the rest of the country. Maybe because there’s a lot of wolfdogs in Germany compared to Denmark.

As for Pandora:
She got a million compliments. Both to her fascinating wolf like look and to her mild and ‘smiling’ behaviour. She really is a darling around other people and dogs.

She met a huge Grand Danois/Broholmer boy, weighing 60 kg and with a head as big as half of Pandora herself.
No fear!

She stole his delicious meat bone and growled at him after that. Very funny, but very no-go.

She saw fireworks, ran in the rain and slept between us in thunder and lightning.

No fear!

She now weighs 11 kg and is looking more ‘adult’ or teenage like.

13 weeks old, being a teenager

Pandora 13 weeks old

Observing sheeps

Observing sheeps